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Title:
Steam Drills in Underground Marble Quarry, West Rutland
Town:
West Rutland
County:
Rutland
State:
Vermont
Date:
1903
Description:
In this steroview, steam drills are seen at work in an underground marble quarry in West Rutland. The image appears to be set at a slant to the left. There are several men working the steam drills. The drills appear to be cutting the bedrock into marble slabs, capable of transport. The drills emit large amounts of steam, that take up most of the image. Other quarrying tools are visible in the foreground. Sunlight patterns suggests the quarry is open in the foreground, covered in the center, and uncovered in the very back. Information included with the stereoview reads, "Underground Marble Quarry, Steam Drills in Operation, West Rutland, Vt. In 'Stones for Building and Decoration' George P. Merrill writes of the West Rutland quarries: 'The quarry descends in the form of a rectangular pit, with almost perpendicular, often overhanging walls, to depth of sometimes more than 300 feet, when the beds are found to curve to the east-ward and pass under the hill becoming thus more nearly horizontal. in following these quarry assumes the appearance of a vast cavern from whose smoke-blackened-blackened gaping mouths one would little suppose could be drawn the huge blocks of snow-white material lying in gigantic piles in the near vicinity. Some of the quarries have been partially roofed over to protect them from snow and rain and seem like mines rather than quarries. The scant day-light at the quarryman in his work. As one peers cautiously over the edge into the black and seemingly bottomless abyss, naught but darkness and ascending smoke and steam are visible, while his astonished ears filled with such unearthly clamor of quarrying machines, the puffing of engines and the shouts of laborers, as is comparable with nothing within the range of our limited experience, and the reader is at liberty to make his own comparisons.'
Filename:
LS14275_000.jpg
Size:
5502 x 2651 pixels; 6427884 bytes
Original Filename:
PMJR0015.jpg
Original Metadata:
Underground Marble Quarry, Steam Drills in Operation, West Rutland, Vt. / In ""Stones for Building and Decoration"" George P. Merrill writes of the West Rutland quarries: ""The quarry descends in the form of a rectangular pit, with almost perpendicular, often overhanging walls, to depth of sometimes more than 300 feet, when the beds are found to curve to the east-ward and pass under the hill becoming thus more nearly horizontal. in following these quarry assumes the appearance of a vast cavern from whose smoke-blackened gaping mouths one would little suppose could be drawn the huge blocks of snow-white material lying in gigantic piles in the near vicinity."" / ""Some of the quarries have been partially roofed over to protect them from snow and rain and seem like mines rather than quarries. The scant day-light at the quarryman in his work. As one peers cautiously over the edge into the black and seemingly bottomless abyss, naught but darkness and ascending smoke and steam are visible, while his astonished ears filled with such unearthly clamor of quarrying machines, the puffing of engines and the shouts of laborers, as is comparable with nothing within the range of our limited experience, and the reader is at liberty to make his own comparisons.""
Keywords:
Quarries and quarrying; Culture; Drilling and boring machinery; Earth Materials; Factories; Geology; Human Activity; Human Constructs; Marble; Marble industry and trade; Men; Nature; People; Quarries and quarrying; Rocks; Rocks,Metamorphic; Work;
Source:
The Vermont Marble Museum
Submitted By:
Kristina Brown
Submitted On:
2008-06-11
Original Media:
Stereoview
Scanning/Digitization/Creation Notes:
MacBook OS X V.10.4.11 CanoScan LiDE 70
Image Scanned By:
Jamie Russell
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Relative Dating Rationale:
copyright date
Times viewed:
445
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