You searched for: all images in the database. Here are the results:

LS14473_000
Chiseling Marble at Vermont Marble Company

Title:
Chiseling Marble at Vermont Marble Company
Town:
Proctor
County:
Rutland
State:
Vermont
Date:
1903
Description:
In this historic image, multiple men are chiseling marble in a workroom at the Vermont Marble Company. There are slabs of marble placed on other pieces of stone throughout the room. Men in caps and aprons hold chisels attached to tubing. Various tool for working the marble, along with brooms and toolboxes, litter the floor and are placed on top of the marble blocks. The following information is printed on the back of the stereoview: "Chiseling Marble- Architectural Department, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont: Much of the stone taken from the West Rutland quarries is shipped in the rough to be worked up elsewhere, but a large part is cut and polished ready for use while the finer stone is utilized in decorative architecture. The blocks of marble are first cut by saws- if a smooth-edged strip of soft iron may be called a saw- driven by might engines; the teeth are furnished by sand continually piled on top of the block and washed into the kerfs by a steady drip of water from above. Next the sawn slabs are polished and shaped by machinery. Those pieces intended for decorative architecture are cut by sand blasts, or electric chisels, or chiseled by hand as this picture shows. The American workmen are not so skillful at this as are the Italians. American marble is not so hard nor so white as Italian marble, but it stands the weather better. It is in common use as a building material and is gradually being used for statuary purposes. The heroic statue of Ethan Allen in the Vermont statehouse is made of it."
Filename:
LS14473_000.jpg
Size:
4163 x 2068 pixels; 5294374 bytes
Original Filename:
PMMD_0009.jpg
Original Metadata:
"Chiseling Marble- Architectural Department, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont" Much of the stone taken from the West Rutland quarries is shipped in the rough to be worked up elsewhere, but a large part is cut and polished ready for use while the finer stone is utilized in decorative architecture. The blocks of marble are first cut by saws- if a smooth-edged strip of soft iron may be called a saw- driven by might engines; the teeth are furnished by sand continually piled on top of the block and washed into the kerfs by a steady drip of water from above. Next the sawn slabs are polished and shaped by machinery. Those pieces intended for decorative architecture are cut by sand blasts, or electric chisels, or chiseled by hand as this picture shows. The American workmen are not so skillful at this as are the Italians. American marble is not so hard nor so white as Italian marble, but it stands the weather better. It is in common use as a building material and is gradually being used for statuary purposes. The heroic statue of Ethan Allen in the Vermont statehouse is made of it.
Keywords:
Quarries and quarrying; Buildings; Culture; Factories; Human Activity; Human Constructs; Machinery; Marble industry and trade; Men; People; Quarries and quarrying; Stone buildings; Stone polishing machinery; Work;
Source:
The Vermont Marble Museum
Submitted By:
Malin Deon
Submitted On:
2008-06-20
Original Media:
Stereoview
Scanning/Digitization/Creation Notes:
MacBook OSX 10.5.2 CanoScan LiDE 90
Image Scanned By:
Malin Deon
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Relative Dating Rationale:
Original metadata
Times viewed:
2447
Landscape Change Menu New Breed Marketing New Breed Marketing University of Vermont University of Vermont The National Endowment for the Humanities National Science Foundation Linthilac Foundation