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Gothic Revival

This Romantic style derived from medieval European church architecture was popular in Vermont from the 1850s to the 1870s. The two most notable defining features of residential Gothic Revival structures are the decorative vergeboards, or bargeboards, in the gable peaks (the gingerbread woodwork) and the pointed arch windows or doors. Although the building plan can vary greatly, Gothic Revivals usually feature at least one prominent steeply pitched gable and often feature a cross-gable plan. High-style Gothic Revivals generally have a more irregular plan, featuring a number of prominent gables.

The following examples of high-style Gothic Revival structures exemplify the exuberance of the style. Note the vergeboards, pointed arches, finials (projections from the gable peak), and prominent gables. The board-and-batten siding, window quarrels (diamond patterns), and lattice-work porches in the lower image are also common high-style Gothic Revival features.

High-Style Gothic Revival

High-Style Gothic Revival: Image courtesy of Robert McCullough

High-Style Gothic Revival

High-Style Gothic Revival: Image courtesy of Robert McCullough

A more typical Gothic Revival house is seen below. The house features many of the character-defining details of the high-style structures but with less exuberance. Note the moldings above the windows, called label moldings, which also appear on many Gothic Revival structures.

Gothic Revival

Gothic Revival: Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

The following images illustrate more modest, vernacular Gothic Revival structures. Note the prominent, steeply pitched wall gable and vergeboards in the image on the top, the pointed windows and steep gables in the center image, and the vergeboards, cross-gable plan, and peaked window lintels in the image on the bottom.

Vernacular Gothic Revival

Vernacular Gothic Revival: Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

Vernacular Gothic Revival

Vernacular Gothic Revival: Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

Vernacular Gothic Revival

Vernacular Gothic Revival: Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

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