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Dating home > Residential Architecture > Architectural Styles > Greek Revival

Greek Revival

The Greek Revival style gained popularity around the 1830s or 1840s in Vermont and remained popular through the 1860s. The Greek Revival style is characterized by its ordered Classical features, many of which are more exuberant than the Federal style. A number of details are commonly found on houses of this style, although not all houses exhibit every characteristic.

High-Style, Symmetrical, Eaves-Front Greek Revival

Two-stories; usually three or five bays wide; center-bay entrance on eaves side

Greek Revival

Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

Distinctive entry porch or portico supported by columns; side porch supported by columns

Entry Porch

Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

Cornice returns or full pediment roof on the gable ends (a full pediment roof forms a triangle at the gable end, while cornice returns form only a partial triangle); a wide entablature beneath the eaves (the wide, white band below the eaves)

Cornice Returns Entabulature Beneath the Eaves

Images courtesy of Elizabeth André

Rectangular stone lintels atop the windows and doors; windows with 6-over-6 sashes; sidelights flanking the door

Rectangular Stone Lintels Rectangular Stone Lintels

Images courtesy of Elizabeth André

Triangular, louvered light in the gable end

Triangular, Louvered Light

Image courtesy of Elizabeth André

Vernacular, Symmetrical, Eaves-Front Greek Revival

1 or 1/2 stories; same features as high-style Greek Revivals but smaller and simpler

The porch and bay window seen in the images below are not original and do not reflect the Greek Revival style.

Vernacular Greek Revival Vernacular Greek Revival

Vernacular Greek Revival

Images courtesy of Elizabeth André

Vernacular, Asymmetrical, Gable-Front Greek Revival

Early examples are usually fairly small; 2 or 1 1/2 stories; cornice returns; side-hall entrance; 6-over-6 sash windows; and a triangular or semi-circular gable light; sidelights, pilasters, and entablature around the entrance

Gable-front Greek Revival Gable-front Greek Revival

Gable-front Greek Revival Gable-front Greek Revival

Gable-front Greek Revival

Images courtesy of Elizabeth André

Later examples are a bit larger; a full 2 stories; often have a peaked, louvered light in the gable end; often have a full pediment roof

The porches on the following structures are not original and do not reflect the Greek Revival style.

2 Storey Greek Revival 2 Storey Greek Revival

2 Storey Greek Revival 2 Storey Greek Revival

Images courtesy of Elizabeth André

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